This week’s top writing advice from around the web for Jan. 16

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(Illustration by Maria Korolov based on image via Pixabay.)

I subscribe to dozens of writing advice sites and new advice articles come into my news reader at a steady pace. You can see some of my favorites at my Writing Advice Sites resource page.

Here are the best writing advice posts from this previous week. Occasionally I include an RSS feed. To subscribe to an RSS feed, add the feed URL to your RSS reader app. The most popular is Feedly, which is the one that I use. It has a website and mobile apps, and it keeps track of which articles you’ve read, synched across all your devices.

You can see all the previous writing advice of the week posts here and subscribe to the RSS feed for this writing advice series here (direct Feedly signup link).

This week, I’ve decided to divide the list into three categories.

The first, for the beginning writer, is about getting the writing process down. Finding time to write, discovering your own writing rituals, learning how to overcome your inner critics, fighting writer’s block, and how to finish what you start. Experienced writers sometimes hit these speedbumps as well, but they can kill a career for a new writer before it even starts.

Second, for the writer who’s already started getting the hang of the mechanics of getting the words down on paper, is improving the quality of the writing. Of course, you can’t improve writing if you don’t have any to improve, so the previous step is critical. But once you’re getting words down, you can start asking yourself if they’re the right words, or maybe you can find better words. And you can even start thinking about sentences, paragraphs, scenes, chapters, plots, character arcs — all that stuff that goes into writing readable work. And even experienced writers probably have areas where they can improve, or new things to learn.

Finally, for the writer who’s finished stories or books that are ready for the public, there’s the question of finding your publishing platform, producing the actual book, finding copyeditors and cover artists, marketing, and advertising. For beginning writers these are mostly theoretical questions, but for experienced writers, they are critical for success. And the answers keep changing as the industry changes, so staying on top of things is critical.

So here we go.

Productivity, mood management, and battling the demons inside

Build Creative Momentum By Setting Micro-Goals For Your Writing by Michael Gallant

Breaking down your writing process into a string of micro-tasks can increase your productivity and help you tackle daunting challenges. Michael Gallant is a writer, musician, composer, producer, and entrepreneur. He lives in New York City. Follow him on Twitter at @Michael_Gallant. BookBaby bills itself as the nation’s leading self-publishing services company. For more advice like this, subscribe to their RSS feed (directly Feedly link here), or follow them on Facebook at @BookBaby or on Twitter at @BookBaby.

Why Fiction Writing Is The Hardest Type Of Writing (And How To Make It Way Easier) by Lauren Sapala

All types of writing can be difficult, let’s be real. But it’s my opinion that fiction writing is THE hardest type of writing for a certain type of writer. It’s the intuitive writers that struggle the most with the fiction writing process, from beginning to end. So, how do you know if you’re an “intuitive writer” and if that’s why you struggle more than most when it comes to fiction writing? Lauren Sapala is a writer and a writing coach. For more advice like this, follow her on Twitter at @losapala, on Facebook at @LaurenSapala, and on YouTube at Lauren Sapala. At LaurenSapala.com, Sapala offers writing advice, courses, and coaching services.

What Do You Need To Write Regularly? by Julie Glover

It can be a challenge to find the time, space, and motivation to write. Let’s tackle each of those and address getting what we need to write regularly. Julie Glover is an award-winning author of mysteries and young adult fiction. She also writes supernatural suspense under the pen name Jules Lynn. For more, check out her website, JulieGlover.com, or follow her on Facebook at @AuthorJulieGlover. Writers in the Storm is another great site for writing advice, with a group of regular contributors and guest writers who post frequently. It is very well worth following on RSS (direct Feedly signup link here).

Writing Mojo: Are You Languishing Or Flourishing? by Lisa Norman

In almost every case, there’s a stage in the project where everything seems to stagnate. All the passion of a new project, all the creativity, fades into crickets. Some authors seem to have more resilience than others, but there’s a stage where they all ask, “Am I sure this will work?” It will, but only if the author can escape the pull of languishing. Lisa Norman writes as Deleyna Marr and is the owner of Deleyna’s Dynamic Designs, a web development company focused on helping writers, and Heart Ally Books, an indie publishing firm. She teaches for Lawson Writer’s Academy. Writers in the Storm is another great site for writing advice, with a group of regular contributors and guest writers who post frequently. It is very well worth following on RSS (direct Feedly signup link here).

One Argument For Writing Every Day by Tonya R. Moore

Recently, writers all over the Internet got outraged over an article declaring that unless you write every day, you’re not a real writer. That’s not true, but if you can carve out the time and summon the wherewithal to write every day, you should. Tonya R. Moore is a Jamaican-born science fiction, horror, and urban fantasy writer from Bradenton, Florida. For more, check out her website, TonyaRMoore.com or follow her on Twitter at @SpaceAgeMermaid or on Facebook at @tonyamoore.writer. A Writer’s Path is an advice site for writers. If you want more advice like this, subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link), on Twitter at @TheRyanLanz and on Facebook at @AWritersPath.

Tricks To Keep Your Writing Hot Even When, Baby, It’S Cold Outside by Mary Carroll Moore

Three tricks that motivate you to keep your writing practice hot when it’s cold outside. Mary Carroll Moore is an award-winning author, editor and book doctor. Check out her website at MaryCarrollMoore.com or follow her on Facebook at @marycarrollmoore. How to Plan, Write, and Develop a Book is a site that offers advice for how to create, craft and sell your novel, memoir or non-fiction book. If you want more advice like this, follow them on their RSS feed (direct Feedly link here) or on Twitter at @writeabook.

Writing One Word Per Day Makes You More Productive by H. Duke

Writing one word a day seems ridiculous, doesn’t it? At that pace, you’d finish a traditional 50,000-word NaNoWriMo novel in just under 137 years. Ah. But the real goal of one word a day is not actually the word itself: the goal is to sit down and start writing. Every day. H. Duke is a fantasy and horror writer. You can see H. Duke’s books on Amazon here and follow her on Facebook at @hdukeauthor and on Twitter at @HDukeAuthor. The Writersaurus offers productivity, writing, and publishing advice. Their RSS feed is here (direct Feedly signup link). Check out their list of recommended writing books here and follow the site on Facebook at @thewritersaurus.

Setting Writing Goals: How To Set Goals And Finish Your Book by J. D. Edwin

Goal setting is not as straightforward as it seems. Bad goals reinforce bad habits. If you want to become a writer and finish your writing projects, you need to set goals that you can meet—while also pushing you to complete your writing projects. J.D. Edwin is a sci-fi author. Follow Edwin on Facebook @JDEdwinAuthor, and on Twitter @JDEdwinAuthor. Her website is JDEdwin.com. The Write Practice is an advice site from a group of writers. They also have a writing critique community and a newsletter. Follow The Write Practice on Twitter, on Facebook, or subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link).

How To Balance Your Fiction Writing With Writing For Pay by Jeanette the Writer

For many fiction and nonfiction writers, words are their whole life. But there are those who take it to extremes. When not typing away at their epic battles, romantic encounters, or lists of how-to’s, they’re working daylight hours at paid blogging, copywriting, and other word-involved jobs. How do these writers do it? How do you balance writing for fun and writing for pay? Jeanette the Writer is a freelance editor and writer based in Dallas, Texas. Visit JeanettetheWriter.com for more info and follow her on Facebook at @JeanettetheWriter or on Twitter at @JeanettetheWrtr. DiyMFA offers classes, advice articles and other training materials for writers. For more advice like this, follow them on Twitter at @DIYMFA and on Facebook at @DIYMFA or subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link).

How To Find Time To Write: 10 Tips And Additional Strategies by Dave Chesson

The idea that you have to wait for the time to be perfect or to feel inspired is one that stops great books from being written. Dave Chesson is the founder of Kindlepreneur is pretty much the top site out there for self-published authors who want to sell more e-books on Amazon. The RSS feed is here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Facebook at @KindlePreneur and Chesson himself on Twitter at @DaveChesson. And make sure to subscribe to his podcast, The Book Marketing Show.

Goal Setting For Writers: 6 Proven Methods To Achieve Success by Dave Chesson

How to set goals that will help you achieve success as an author. Dave Chesson is the founder of Kindlepreneur. The RSS feed is here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Facebook at @KindlePreneur and Chesson himself on Twitter at @DaveChesson. And make sure to subscribe to his podcast, The Book Marketing Show. Kindlepreneur is pretty much the top site out there for self-published authors who want to sell more e-books on Amazon.

How To Develop A Writing Habit: 13 Tips For Consistent Writing by Jason Hamilton

Sometimes our writing could be on point, and we get a ton done in a single day, only for that mountain of work to stagnate as we spend many more days writing nothing. This is where developing a writing habit comes in handy. Jason Hamilton is a fantasy author. Check out Hamilton’s site, MythBank, full of reading and viewing guides to the most popular sci-fi and fantasy works. You can also follow him on Twitter at @StoryHobbit and on Facebook at Jason Hamilton. Kindlepreneur is pretty much the top site out there for self-published authors who want to sell more e-books on Amazon. The RSS feed is here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Facebook at @KindlePreneur and founder Dave Chesson on Twitter at @DaveChesson.

Are You Planning Or Resisting? by Anne Janzer

To avoid being seen, resistance often hides behind other socially-acceptable behaviors, such as planning and preparation. Anne Janzer is an award-winning author, armchair cognitive science geek, nonfiction author coach, marketing practitioner, and blogger. Follow her on Facebook at @AnneHJanzer or on Twitter at @AnneJanzer. At AnneJanzer.com, Janzer offers writing and publishing advice. For more like this, subscribe to the site’s RSS feed (directly Feedly link here).

Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Forgetting To Read by Michael Woodson

The Writer’s Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so this series helps identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week’s mistake is forgetting to read. Michael Woodson is a content editor at Writers Digest. If you want more stuff like this, follow Writer’s Digest via their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link), on Twitter at @WritersDigest and on Facebook at @writersdigest. This venerable resource for writers celebrated its hundred-year anniversary last year, but is still going pretty strong. Follow Writer’s Digest via their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link), on Twitter at @WritersDigest and on Facebook at @writersdigest.

The art and craft of writing

Writing Set-Up For The Big Reveal! by Beem Weeks

Most writers know what the set-up entails. It’s those breadcrumbs sprinkled throughout the story that leads to the big reveal at the end. The set-up should lead to a big reveal that surprises readers—or even blows a few minds. The reveal should bring understanding to those set-up points embedded within the story. Award-winning novelist Beem Weeks is an author, editor, podcaster, video producer, and a member of Fresh Ink Publishing. Find out more at BeemWeeks.com.
For more advice like this, follow the Story Empire Blog on Facebook at @StoryEmpire5 or on Twitter at @StoryEmpire or get their RSS feed here (direct Feedly signup link).

Writers, Grab A Knife: How To Kill Your Darlings by Sue Coletta

Good writing involves rewriting. An essential part of rewriting is combing through the first draft and carving out material that isn’t essential. When we edit out nonessentials, we are killing our darlings. What is a Darling? Darlings are words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, and even whole scenes that we’re often most proud of. Sue Coletta is an award-winning crime writer. Sue also appeared on the Emmy award-winning true crime series, Storm of Suspicion and will be teaching an advanced education course on serial killers for Foothills Regional. For more about her, check out her website at SueColetta.comand follow her on Facebook at @SueColetta1 and on Twitter at @SueColetta1. Writers Helping Writers is a great site for writing advice. These guys also have the One Stop for Writers online tool set. Subscribe to them via their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link here) or follow them on Facebook at @DescriptiveThesaurusCollection or on Twitter at @WriterThesaurus.

Writing Motivation-Reaction Units (Mrus According To Swain) by September Fawkes

Motivation-reaction units are used at the line level of writing–they’re about getting the story written on the page properly and most effectively. Some writers have the tendency to write events in the wrong order, at the sentence level. September Hawkes is a freelance editor. follow her on Twitter @SeptCFawkes and on Facebook at September C. Fawkes. At SeptemberCFawkes.com, Fawkes offers writing advice. Follow the site on its RSS Feed (direct Feedly signup link).

Characters With Concrete Thinking Vs. Abstract Thinking by Ross Hartmann

If our goal is to write characters that are realistic and akin to our own human complexities, understanding more about those complexities will only strengthen our ability to craft the characters that we so desire for our stories and our readers. Ross Hartmann is the author of The Structure of Story and the creative director at Kiingo. Follow Hartmann on Twitter here. Kiingo is a writing and story telling school with online courses, how-to articles, and the book The Structure of Story. Follow them on their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link), on Twitter here, on Facebook here, or support them on Patreon.

The Approach To The Inmost Cave: How To Write This Scene In The Hero’s Journey by David Safford

Every great heroic story has that moment. It’s the deep breath before the plunge. The calm before the storm. The quiet before the calamity. In the Hero’s Journey, it’s the Approach before the Ordeal. It’s an essential moment you need to plan for and build around as you draft your story. And to do it right, you’re going to need to figure out three key elements. David Safford writes adventure stories. Read his latest story at his website DavidSafford.com/. The Write Practice is an advice site from a group of writers. They also have a writing critique community and a newsletter. Follow The Write Practice on Twitter, on Facebook, or subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link).

4 Responses To Uncertainty That Create Tension In Fiction by Lisa Hall-Wilson

When the stakes are raised different personalities handle uncertainty in varied ways that can create all sorts of really compelling internal conflict. Lisa Hall-Wilson is a writing teacher and award-winning writer and author. She also has two courses on writing in deep point of view that you might want to check out: Writing in Emotional Layers and Deep Point Of View Foundations can help you learn the effects the tools used in deep POV aim to create, so you can use those tools to best serve your story and your voice. Follow her on Twitter at @LisaHallWilson or on Facebook at @lisahallwilson. Her website is LisaHallWilson.com. Oh her, website, LisaHallWilson.com, Lisa Hall Wilson offers writing advice, books about writing, and writing courses.

Writing Details: Brilliant Or Boring? by Linda S. Clare

Your fourth grade teacher probably urged you to include details in your writing. “Don’t write about a car,” she may have said, “but a red car, a ’67 Mustang. Be specific.” When do details enhance and when do they hinder? Linda S. Clare has been writing professionally since 1993 and has taught fiction, memoir and essay writing for Lane Community College for more than a dozen years. In addition to her published books, award-winning short stories, articles and essays, she works as an expert writing advisor for George Fox University and is a frequent presenter at writers’ conferences. For more advice like this, check out her website, LindaSClare.com on Twitter at @Lindasclare. LindaSClare.com offers advice about writing and story structure, as well as coaching services.

Determining Relevant Conflict by Kathryn Craft

How do you know if you’re choosing conflict that’s relevant? Aligning your novel’s key structures will help you stay on track. Novelist Kathryn Craft has been a freelance developmental editor at Writing-Partner.com since 2006, and teaches in Drexel University’s MFA program. Learn more on her website, KathrynCraft.com or follow her on Facebook at @KathrynCraftAuthor and on Twitter at @kcraftwriter. Writer Unboxed is a fantastic writing advice site, with lots of helpful articles from some of the biggest names in the field. Follow them on RSS (direct Feedly signup link) and on Twitter.

Open Your Scenes With These 3 Cinematic Techniques by C. S. Lakin

If a writer doesn’t deliver what a reader hopes for on that first page, it’s going to be tough to convince the reader to stick around for the whole chapter—let alone the whole book. C. S. Lakin is a writing coach, workshop instructor, award-winning author of over 30 books, and blogger at Live Write Thrive. Her Writer’s Toolbox series of books teach the craft of fiction, and her online video courses at Writing for Life Workshops have helped more than a thousand writers. She also works as a book copyeditor and does more than 200 critiques a year for writers, agents, and publishers in six continents. I’ve been reading her advice for a few years now and she is awesome. If you want more advice from her, follow her on Twitter at @LiveWriteThrive and on Facebook at @C.S.Lakin.Author. Live Write Thrive is a writing advice site by novelist, editor and writing coach C. S. Lakin, author of eight-book The Writer’s Toolbox Series. Follow her on Twitter @LiveWriteThrive. Also check out her other site, The Self Publisher.

The Logistics And Considerations Of Giants In War by Michael Schwarz

What are the logistics of having an army made of giants three times larger than their opponents? Michael Schwarz offers advice about fighting and battles. Advice on how to create realistic fight scenes and characters from a third-degree Black Belt. This site is mostly in an Q&A style, with more than 500 fight-related questions answered. If you like the site, you can support them on Patreon. Their RSS feed is here (direct Feedly signup link).

How To Keep Your Favorite Character From Ruining Your Story by Chris Winkle

The first step to fixing a “candied” character is recognizing them. Chris Winkle is the founder and editor-in-chief of Mythcreants. Mythcreants is my all-time favorite writing advice site. Get their RSS feed here (direct Feedly signup link) or follow them on Twitter @Mythcreants and on Facebook at @mythcreants.

How Do I Establish Backstory? by Oren Ashkenazi

To include important backstory in a book, introduce it in such a way that it’s relevant to the current plot. That’s what makes it compelling context instead of boring filler. Oren Ashkenazi is a speculative fiction manuscript editor at Mythcreants. Mythcreants is my all-time favorite writing advice site. Get their RSS feed here (direct Feedly signup link) or follow them on Twitter @Mythcreants and on Facebook at @mythcreants.

How To Write A Round Character: Definition And Examples by Dave Chesson

A round character is one that is complex and multifaceted enough to be believable for the reader. A round character’s personality mimics that of a real person through their actions, words, choices, and reactions to conflict. Dave Chesson is the founder of Kindlepreneur which is pretty much the top site out there for self-published authors who want to sell more e-books on Amazon. The RSS feed is here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Facebook at @KindlePreneur and Chesson himself on Twitter at @DaveChesson. And make sure to subscribe to his podcast, The Book Marketing Show.

250+ Character Quirks For Believable Characters by Jason Hamilton

Quirks are tiny details that help transform an otherwise average character into something more interesting. Here’s how to incorporate them, with over 250 examples of quirks.
Jason Hamilton is a fantasy author. Check out Hamilton’s site, MythBank, full of reading and viewing guides to the most popular sci-fi and fantasy works. You can also follow him on Twitter at @StoryHobbit and on Facebook at Jason Hamilton. Kindlepreneur is pretty much the top site out there for self-published authors who want to sell more e-books on Amazon. The RSS feed is here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Facebook at @KindlePreneur and founder Dave Chesson on Twitter at @DaveChesson.

Would I Lie To You? A Case Against The Unreliable Narrator by PJ Parrish

Reading a well-conceived unreliable narrator is a treat. Writing one can be a nightmare. It’s a hard technique to pull off, and frankly, it’s become a bit stale in crime fiction and thrillers. PJ Parrish is the New York Times and USA Today bestseller author of the Louis Kincaid thrillers. Her books have won the Shamus, Anthony, International Thriller Awards and been nominated for the Edgar. Visit her at PJParrish.com or follow her on Facebook at PJ Parrish. The Kill Zone is the home of eleven top suspense writers and publishing professionals. They cover the publishing business, marketing how-tos, and the craft of writing. Follow them on RSS here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Twitter @killzoneauthors.

How To Spot and Rewrite Fluff by Sue Coletta

Those dang pesky buggers that sneak into first drafts and weaken the writing are called filler words and phrases—also known as fluff. If a filler word serves a purpose, keep it. The objective is to tighten the writing by eliminating unnecessary words and anything the reader might find distracting. Sue Coletta is an award-winning crime writer. Sue also appeared on the Emmy award-winning true crime series, Storm of Suspicion and will be teaching an advanced education course on serial killers for Foothills Regional. For more about her, check out her website at SueColetta.comand follow her on Facebook at @SueColetta1 and on Twitter at @SueColetta1. The Kill Zone is the home of eleven top suspense writers and publishing professionals. They cover the publishing business, marketing how-tos, and the craft of writing. Follow them on RSS here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Twitter @killzoneauthors.

5 Times It’S Okay To Write Stereotypes (Really!) by Lucy V Hay

It’s accepted modern writing wisdom that writers should never, ever, ever, ever write stereotypes. A stereotype is a simplification, a short-hand if you will. It’s generally thought nowadays that only BAD writers use stereotypes. But writers can use stereotypes whenever they want … as long as it’s ON PURPOSE, not by accident. Lucy Hay is a script editor, author and blogger who helps writers at her site, Bang2write.com. Follow Bang2write.com on Twitter at @Bang2write and on Facebook at @Bang2writers.

Relationship Thesaurus: Frenemies by Becca Puglisi

The dynamics that accompany the relationship between frenemies and the role they can play in crafting a story. This article is part of the Relationship Thesaurus series. Becca Puglisi is one of the founders of the Writers Helping Writers website and the author of the Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression, which has sold over half a million copies. I own a copy and refer to it nearly every day. Writers Helping Writers is a great site for writing advice. These guys also have the One Stop for Writers online tool set. Subscribe to them via their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link here) or follow them on Facebook at @DescriptiveThesaurusCollection or on Twitter at @WriterThesaurus.

How To Write Gripping Scenes by Stavros Halvatzis

On one level a scene must showcase the hero’s actions, such as a response to some challenge aimed against him. Actions fuel the so-called outer journey of the story—the plot. But on an underlying level a scene ought to contribute to the hero’s inner journey. Stavros Halvatzis is a writer and writing teacher. For more advice like this, check out StavrosHalvatzis.com or follow him via his RSS feed (direct Feedly link here).

Welcome To Worldly Wise: Debunking Myths About Speculative Fiction by Disha Walia

If you have been eyeing the literary “super genre” but something someone once said has been holding you back, let’s dive right in and debunk some common myths about speculative fiction. Disha Walia is a lifelong storyteller and an enthusiastic writer and editor in love with the idea of exploring the creative world of words. Connect with her on Quillinary.com or follow her on Twitter at @quillinary. DiyMFA offers classes, advice articles and other training materials for writers. For more advice like this, follow them on Twitter at @DIYMFA and on Facebook at @DIYMFA or subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link).

Tapping Your Memories For Emotional Truths On The Page by Kris Spisak

Sharing even a fraction of our feelings with our characters will help our stories feel more authentic. Here, Kris Spisak explains how to tap into our memories to tell emotional truths on the page. Kris Spisak is the author of Get a Grip on Your Grammar: 250 Writing and Editing Reminders for the Curious or Confused and The Novel Editing Workbook, Also, check out her Words You Should Know podcast. She also serves on the advisory board of James River Writers. Learn more or sign up for her monthly writing tips newsletter at Kris-Spisak.com. This venerable resource for writers celebrated its hundred-year anniversary last year, but is still going pretty strong. Follow Writer’s Digest via their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link), on Twitter at @WritersDigest and on Facebook at @writersdigest.

How To Write Short Stories Worth Reading by James Scott Bell

Keeping one shattering moment in mind gives you all the direction you’ll need to write a short story worth reading. Just add your own stamp and creativity. Thriller writer James Scott Bell is the author of more than twenty books about writing, and you can follow him on Twitter at @jamesscottbell. His website is JamesScottBell.com. The Kill Zone is the home of eleven top suspense writers and publishing professionals. They cover the publishing business, marketing how-tos, and the craft of writing. Follow them on RSS here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Twitter @killzoneauthors.

The business side of writing

Creating A Promotional Author Video by Mae Clair

Have you ever created a promotional video? Video is an excellent feature to add to your website for enhanced visibility. Mae Clair writes supernatural suspense. For more about her, visit her website, MaeClair.com or follow her on Twitter at @MaeClair1. For more advice like this, follow the Story Empire Blog on Facebook at @StoryEmpire5 or on Twitter at @StoryEmpire or get their RSS feed here (direct Feedly signup link).

Before You Say No, Ask Why by Jessica Faust

If you want to fight the agent or say no to a revision suggestion that’s entirely within your right. But before you say no to an agent’s suggestion (no matter how ludicrous) ask yourself why the agent is suggesting it. Most of us have a method to our madness and yes, some of us are truly mad. Jessica Faust is the owner and president at the BookEnds literary agency. Follow her on Twitter at @BookEndsJessica or on Instagram at @jfaust_bookends or email her directly at [email protected]. BookEnds is a literary agency that represents more than 300 authors and illustrations, both fiction and non-fiction, including several New York Times and USA today bestsellers. They are currently open to submissions. If you want more advice like this, subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link) or follow them on Twitter at @bookendslit or on Facebook at @BookEndsLiterary.

Blog Posts And Seo by Sabrina Ricci

When it comes to people learning about you and your work, content (marketing) is king. And when it comes to content marketing, blog posts and SEO are a great way for readers to find your writing. Sabrina Ricci writes advice about indie publishing. Follow her on Facebook at @sabrinadenisericci or on Twitter at @sabsky. Digital Publishing is a site about indie publishing. Follow them via their RSS feed (direct Feedly link here).

Who Are Your Readers And Why Does It Matter? by Kathleen Baldwin

Readers are motile evolving entities. They have made some massive changes in the last decade. So even if you think you know who your readers are—they may have changed. Kathleen Baldwin is an award-winning author. For more, check out her website, KathleenBaldwin.com or follow her on Facebook at @KathleenBaldwinAuthor. Writers in the Storm is another great site for writing advice, with a group of regular contributors and guest writers who post frequently. It is very well worth following on RSS (direct Feedly signup link here).

Psychology Of Selling: Understanding The Consumer by Kristen Lamb

Too many authors fixate on the price of the book and forget the psychology driving the purchase. Mystery author Kristen Lamb is also the author of the social media guide book, Rise of the Machines: Human Authors in a Digital World as well as We Are Not Alone: The Writer’s Guide to Social Media and Are You There, Blog? It’s Me, Writer. Follow her on Twitter at @KristenLambTX or on Facebook at @authorkristenlamb. If you want more advice like this, follow the Kristen Lamb blog via its RSS feed (direct Feedly link).

Kwl – 280 – Panels And Conventions With Sam Maggs by Rachel Wharton and Joni Di Placido

Bestselling author and writer of comics and video games Sam Maggs returns to the podcast this week to discuss writing across different mediums and to share her expertise on speaking at conventions. Rachel Wharton is the author engagement coordinator at Kobo Writing Life. Joni Di Placido is the author engagement specialist at Kobo Writing Life. Kobo Writing Life is the writing advice site from the people behind the Kobo reader. For more like this, subscribe to their RSS feed (directly Feedly link here).

5 Questions To Ask Yourself To Create A Stronger Author Brand by Penny Sansevieri

We hear the term author branding a lot, and truthfully it always feels a bit nebulous. Creating an author brand feels hard. But it doesn’t have to be. Penny Sansevieri is the CEO and founder of Author Marketing Experts, an adjunct professor at NYU, and a best-selling author and internationally recognized book marketing and media relations expert. Follow her on Twitter at @Bookgal and on Facebook at @therealbookgal. Her book, How to Sell Books by the Truckload on Amazon, has just been updated for 2021 and is in Kindle Unlimited. Author Marketing Experts is a book promotion company. For more advice like this subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link).

Five Ways A Five Pillar Foundation Can Help Build Your Author Brand by Soleah K. Sadge

Whether you are a novice writer or an experienced author, branding yourself—preferably early—will help you in the long run. Soleah K. Sadge is a contemporary fantasy author. For more information, visit Soleah’s website at SoleahKennaSadge.com or follow her on Twitter at @sksadge . DiyMFA offers classes, advice articles and other training materials for writers. For more advice like this, follow them on Twitter at @DIYMFA and on Facebook at @DIYMFA or subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link).

Naming Your Baby by Elaine Viets

Tips for picking book titles, including titles for individual books in a series. Elaine Viets has written 30 mysteries in four series. Check out her website at ElaineViets.com. The Kill Zone is the home of eleven top suspense writers and publishing professionals. They cover the publishing business, marketing how-tos, and the craft of writing. Follow them on RSS here (direct Feedly signup link). Follow them on Twitter @killzoneauthors.

Business Musings: Digital Growth: Indie Publishing by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Digitally speaking, the past two years have been phenomenal. The changes that those of us who went digital early had been expecting year after year after year have finally arrived. New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Kristine Kathryn Rusch writes bestselling science fiction and fantasy, award-winning mysteries, acclaimed mainstream fiction, controversial nonfiction, and the occasional romance. At KrisWrites.com, Rusch offers her thoughts about the publishing industry and other topics.

3 Things To Know When Hiring A Pro by Tiffany Yates Martin

No matter what service you’re planning to hire, there are three specific areas you need to focus on to avoid wasting money, and nail down what you need to know to make sure you hire the right professional for your needs. Tiffany Yates Martin has spent nearly thirty years as an editor in the publishing industry, working with major publishers and New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today bestselling and award-winning authors as well as indie and newer writers, and is the founder of FoxPrint Editorial and author of the bestseller Intuitive Editing: A Creative and Practical Guide to Revising Your Writing. FoxPrint Editorial offers online courses, workshops and presentations, and advice to authors.

7 Deadly Query Sins: How To Write A Query That Won’T End Up In Spam by Anne R. Allen

When a writer complains that everybody in traditional publishing is crooked, or that the whole industry is rigged against new writers, you can usually be sure the author’s manuscript needs work. But it could also be that he doesn’t know how to write a query. Anne Allen started her career at Bantam and knows her way around the publishing industry. Allen also writes mysteries and how-to books about writing. For more advice like this, follow her on Twitter at @annerallen or on Facebook at @annerallenauthor. Anne R. Allen’s Blog… with Ruth Harris offers advice from a couple of publishing industry veterans. For more advice like this, subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly link).

12 Options for Print on Demand Books (Options for Authors) by Gloria Russell

The full free guide to print on demand books covers everything you need to know, including what print on demand books is and the top companies in the space. Gloria Russell is a freelance writer and author living in Colorado who also critiques manuscripts. Self Publishing School offers online courses about self publishing, as well as a podcast, blog, and other resources. For more advice like this subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link), on Twitter at @Self_Pub_School and on Facebook at @Self Publishing School.

Podcasts

Content Marketing And Repurposing For Authors With Amy Woods by Sacha Black

Sacha Black talks to marketing exprt Amy Woods all about content marketing and repurposing. Sacha Black is a fantasy author and writing coach, with several writing advice books including 13 Steps to Evil: How to Craft Superbad Villains (Better Writers Series) May 9, 2017. Follow her on her website, Sacha Black, on Facebook at @Sacha Black or on Twitter at @sacha_black. Sacha Black is a site that offers writing advice, courses, and podcasts. Follow the site via their RSS feed (direct Feedly link here).

A Writer’s Guide To The End Of Self-Doubt With William Kenower by Joanna Penn

How can we recognize self-doubt and create alongside it as part of the author journey? How can we write with confidence and double down on what we love the most? William Kenower talks about these aspects and more. William Kenower is the author of nonfiction books on writing, the editor-in-chief of Author Magazine and the host of the Author2Author podcast. His latest book is Everyone Has What it Takes: A Writer’s Guide to the End of Self-Doubt. Joanna Penn has been sharing writing and publishing advice since 2008 at The Creative Penn and is the author of Successful Self-Publishing and many other writing and publishing advice books. She also has one of my favorite writing advice podcasts, and you can subscribe to it on Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher. The Creative Penn offers articlesvideosbookstools, and courses for independent authors.

World Building And Character Friendships In A Ya Fairy Tale Retelling – Interview With Leslie Vedder by Gabriela Pereira

Gabriela Pereira talks with Leslie Vedder about her YA debut novel The Bone Spindle. Vedder is a queer ace author who loves fairytale retellings with girl adventurers. Gabriela Pereira is a writer, teacher, and self-proclaimed word nerd and the founder and instigator of DIYMFA.com, with a mission is to empower writers to take an entrepreneurial approach to their education and professional growth. DiyMFA offers classes, advice articles and other training materials for writers. For more advice like this, follow them on Twitter at @DIYMFA and on Facebook at @DIYMFA or subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link).

Making More Money Selling Your Books Direct by Lindsay Buroker

If you’re self-publishing, and you have the rights to sell your books/ebooks/audiobooks directly from your site, and you’re not doing so, you could be leaving a lot of money on the table. Lindsay Buroker writes fantasy and science fiction. Check out her website at Lindsay Buroker.com or follow her on Facebook at @Lindsay Buroker or on Twitter at @GoblinWriter. Six Figure Authors is a podcast about taking your writing career to the next level.

Videos

What A Cover Says About A Book by Jessica Faust and James McGowan

In today’s video, Jessica and James take you behind-the-scenes and discuss the book cover design journey as well as what a cover does for your book. Jessica Faust is the owner and president at the BookEnds literary agency. Follow her on Twitter at @BookEndsJessica or on Instagram at @jfaust_bookends or email her directly at [email protected]. James McGowan is a literary agent at the agency. BookEnds is a literary agency that represents more than 300 authors and illustrations, both fiction and non-fiction, including several New York Times and USA today bestsellers. They are currently open to submissions. If you want more advice like this, subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link) or follow them on Twitter at @bookendslit or on Facebook at @BookEndsLiterary.

How Do You Cut Words From A Book That’s Too Long? by Daphne Gray-Grant

Daphne Gray-Grant offers some advice on how to cut words from a book that’s about twice as long as it should be. Daphne Gray-Grant is a writing coach, author of Your Happy First Draft, and host of The Write Question show on YouTube. Publication Coach offers books, courses, videos, and one-on-one coaching for authors. If you want more advice like this, subscribe to their RSS feed (direct Feedly signup link) or follow them on Twitter at @pubcoach or subscribe to their YouTube channel.

Youtube For Authors (With Jenna Moreci) by Kristina Adams and Ellie Betts

Kristina Adams and Ellie Betts talk with Jenna Moreci, is a bestselling author of dark fantasy and science fiction, as well as a YouTube sensation with hundreds of thousands of subscribers. She gives advice about how to get over the fear of being on video and what kind of content your audience wants to see.
Kristina Adams is a bestselling author and writing instructor. Find out more at her website, KristinaAdamsAuthor.com. The Writer’s Cookbook offers advice, podcast, videos, coaching, workshops, and writing courses. Follow the site via their RSS feed (direct Feedly link here).


Am I missing any writing advice sites? Email me at [email protected].

MetaStellar editor and publisher Maria Korolov is a science fiction novelist, writing stories set in a future virtual world. And, during the day, she is an award-winning freelance technology journalist who covers artificial intelligence, cybersecurity and enterprise virtual reality. See her Amazon author page here and follow her on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. Email her at [email protected]. She is also the editor and publisher of Hypergrid Business, one of the top global sites covering virtual reality.

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